Broadcast Education Association Recognizes UM J-School Students, Professor Jule Banville Wins “Best of Competition”

Associate Professor Jule Banville won the “Best of Competition” in the Broadcast Education Association’s annual awards with an audio story about a woman who owns the town of Pray in Montana’s Paradise Valley and can’t find someone to buy it. Contributed photo: Barbara Walker.

The Broadcast Education Association has recognized the excellent work of University of Montana School of Journalism students in its annual awards competition and given Associate Professor Jule Banville the “Best of Competition” award for an audio documentary that aired on her podcast, Last Best Stories.

Banville’s award comes from the faculty division of the competition, which also recognizes student work. More than 1,530 entries were considered. Banville’s work will be featured at the annual BEA Festival of Media Arts in April in Las Vegas.

UM Journalism School students and projects placing in the student division include: 

The Meth Effect, a multimedia reporting project that came out of a class co-taught by JuleBanville and Associate Professor of Journalism Lee Banville, won 2nd place in the Interactive Media and Emerging Technologies Competition, large team division.

Journalism Senior Rosie Costain won 2nd Place with “Accordion Man” in the Student News/Radio Feature competition.

Nora Saks, a student in the Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism graduate program, won the “award of excellence” in radio hard news reporting for her story on two sisters tackling drug use on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation. The story aired on Montana Public Radio and NPR’s Weekend Edition last spring.  

UM News, the weekly news segment produced by senior broadcast journalism students, was awarded 2nd place in the Television Newscast category.

Banville’s winning entry is an audio story about a woman who owns the town of Pray in Montana’s Paradise Valley and can’t find someone to buy it. It can be heard as Episode 11 of Last Best Stories, “Owning Pray.” 

 

Banville’s podcast, which launched in 2015, has been featured in the Missoula Independent, the Missoulian, the Bozeman Daily Chronicle, Distinctly Montana magazine, and newsletters that include the Flyover Podcast and the Audit. Via the podcast, she was also a guest on NPR’s “It’s Been a Minute With Sam Sanders.”

Meet the Professors: Kevin Tompkins

We are constantly hearing from students that one of the J-School’s biggest strengths is the dedicated, talented, fearless, experienced, fun, doors-are-always-open faculty.

The students in our Social Media and Engagement class set out to tell that story via Instagram. Over the coming weeks, we will highlight these stories, which illustrate the personalities, philosophies and experience of our top-notch faculty. This week, we give you the newest member of the faculty, Visiting Assistant Professor Kevin Tompkins.

Kevin teaches intermediate videography and intermediate directing. Kevin says, “I think the one thing I’ve noticed in my first semester-and-a-half that I’ve been here is that I want the students to be confident and feel comfortable doing what they’re doing, because I think that’s going to make you better in whatever you do.”

 

 

Other profiles in the #meettheprofs series: 

Jule Banville

Denise Dowling

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Professors: Denise Dowling

We are constantly hearing from students that one of the J-School’s biggest strengths is the dedicated, talented, fearless, experienced, fun, doors-are-always-open faculty.

The Social Media and Engagement class set out to tell that story via Instagram. Over the coming weeks, we will highlight these stories, which illustrate the personalities, philosophies and experience of our top-notch faculty. This week, we give you the second in the series, Associate Professor Denise Dowling.

Denise, a graduate of our very own J-School, teaches intermediate audio, advanced audio, intermediate video reporting, advanced video reporting and ethics and trends in news media. Denise wanted to be a journalist because she, “wants to know everything about everybody!”


Denise came to the school after 20 years in the TV news, first at KPAX-TV while an undergrad at UM.  She moved on to stations in Montana, Colorado and Washington, working as a director, technical director, producer, executive producer and managing editor.

She spent 17 years working in Spokane, working at both the ABC and NBC affiliates. She won a number of Emmy Awards and Edward R. Murrow awards as part of teams that covered a firestorm, flooding, an ice storm and the arrest of a serial killer.

 

Other profiles in the #meettheprofs series: 

Jule Banville

Kevin Tompkins