Reporter David Fahrenthold to Speak at UM

David Fahrenthold: Washington Post staff portraits on September, 09, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post)
Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold in Washington, DC.
(Photo by Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)

Washington Post reporter David Fahrenthold will deliver “Covering President Trump: The inside story from the reporter Trump called a ‘nasty guy.’” His talk is Monday, March 13 at 7 p.m. in the University Center Ballroom. This event is free and open to the public.

Fahrenthold spent a year covering the 2016 presidential race and then-Republican nominee Donald Trump. He will talk about his experience on the campaign trail and what it was like to cover Trump. Fahrenthold began working for The Post in 2000. He covered car crashes in the District of Columbia and has also covered the environment and Capitol Hill. He is currently covering President Trump.

This event is sponsored by the University of Montana School of Journalism. The School of Journalism launched in 1914, and has trained generations of journalists in print, broadcast, photography and, more recently, new media. The school regularly ranks among the top 10 journalism schools in the United States.

Susan Carey to Deliver Cole Lecture at UM

Susan CareySusan Carey, veteran aviation reporter at The Wall Street Journal, will deliver the annual Jeff Cole Distinguished Lecture at 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 13, at the University of Montana. The event, which is free and open to the public, will be held inside the Alexander Blewett III School of Law Room 101.

The talk, titled “Old School in the New Journalism Era,” is the ninth installment of the UM School of Journalism’s annual Jeff Cole Distinguished Lecture Series. The series honors Cole, a Butte native who graduated from the School of Journalism in 1980. He was the aeronautics editor at The Wall Street Journal when he was killed in a plane crash while on assignment in January 2001.

Carey joined the Journal at age 25 to cover coal mining, steel, labor unions and Appalachia. She later covered airlines, aerospace and tourism in Europe where she witnessed the fall of the Berlin Wall. From there, she reported for the Asian WSJ in Hong Kong and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

While in Asia, she met Jeff Cole. She describes him as “a wonderful friend and an inspiration.”

The lecture is supported by the Jeff Cole Legacy Fund, which also offers an annual scholarship and a spring dinner for students who work at the Montana Kaimin, UM’s independent student newspaper.

The UM School of Journalism launched in 1914, and has trained generations of journalists in print, broadcast, photography and, more recently, new media. The school regularly ranks among the top 10 journalism schools in the United States.

MTJA Kicks Off New Trip With A Look Inside Fukushima

Logo for UM to Fukushima
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In May 2017, a group of Montana Journalism Abroad (MTJA) students will travel to Japan and report on the issues that continue to affect people displaced by a trio of disasters that struck the northeast part of the country in 2011. On March 11 of that year, a severe earthquake triggered a tsunami that decimated coastal towns, and damage from the wave led to the meltdown of nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant. The nuclear fallout forced citizens to drop everything and leave their homes behind. After five years of clean-up efforts, the government has started to encourage people to return to their homes, but many people remain fearful of lingering radiation.

During their trip, the students will tour the affected areas, interview citizens and government officials, and then produce a multimedia package that tells the stories of the Fukushima nuclear disaster. These stories of displacement will resonate with Montanans who are no stranger to natural and industrial disasters, such as wildfires and leaking mine waste. As the group prepares for the trip, they are raising public awareness of the ongoing challenges of Fukushima residents.

With the screening of the documentary “Alone in Fukushima,” students invite the Missoula community to take a closer look at life inside the red zone. Just seven miles away from the nuclear power plant, Naoto Matsumura is the only person left in town. He risks the radiation to look after the domesticated animals that families left behind. Japanese filmmaker Mayu Nakamura follows Matsumura on his quest to care for the creatures and save them from starvation. poster for Alone in Fukushima film. The film will be shown Nov. 17 at 6:30 p.m. in the Payne Native American Center, room 11.

This Thursday, November 17, join the students of MTJA as they screen “Alone in Fukushima” at 6:30 p.m. in room 210 of the J-School. After the film, the director will skype in from Japan for a Q&A session. Admittance is free, but any donations are welcome and will help reduce travel costs.
Check out the trailer for Mayu Nakamura’s documentary “Alone in Fukushima” on YouTube.

By Jana Wiegand